Stay Cool Kids

Stay Cool Kids

The sizzle of sunburn is not something I enjoy so I am very grateful for Past Me who stocked up on suncream. Here’s my top tips for keeping your complexion healthy and avoiding lobster doom whether you’re going abroad or staying home.  

🌻Use suncream every day and top it up regularly, especially if you’re outside during the day. 

🌻Drink lots of water, you get dehydrated quickly in the summer and being taken to hospital and put on a drip can really wreck your holiday. Buy a water bottle and carry it with you – pop it in the fridge before you go out to keep it cool. 

🌻Moisturise! Your skin gets thirsty too and needs love. 

🌻Stay out of the midday sun – the hottest part of the day is the worst. 

🌻Eat delicious water filled nutrients in watermelon, cucumber, and other fruits. Ideally eat things in season as they taste better. 

🌻Don’t forget our furry pals – they can’t take off their fluffy jackets so make sure they have plenty of water, add an ice cube or two to help them stay cool. 

🌻Stop sleeping under your winter duvet! If you need covers a light blanket or spare sheet instead so you don’t get too hot at night. 

🌻Open the windows when you get home. Air out your home and cool it down. If you can, open your doors as well. 

🌻Water your plants. Use water left in your kettle or water bottles rather than pour it away. If you have a garden get a water butt – they’re inexpensive and will save on your water bills, as long as it rains. 

🌻Most importantly have fun! 

My BorrowMyDoggy experience

My BorrowMyDoggy experience

At the beginning of the year I signed up to BorrowMyDoggy – a service designed to connect dog owners with dog lovers who can’t have their own canine chum. 

Our flat is too small, we are both out all day and we don’t have a garden so having a dog is currently out of the question. 

I took advantage of a special offer on the price of the membership, otherwise it might be a bit pricey for some. 

I created a profile and messaged a few local dog owners (it gives you an approximate location) but nothing happened. 

A few weeks ago I got a reply from a lady who lives across the dual carriageway from me (about 10 minutes walk) – how lucky was that! 

I met Flick and her human, Susan, and we had a chat and a cuddle (Flick) and now Flick and I go to the park a few times a week for a walk and a play. For an older dog she’s very keen on running around the park and exploring the messages left my other dogs.

She’s a smart pup who goes into school to hear children read and help them build their confidence so she’s super friendly and gentle. Hopefully soon she’ll be coming over for a picnic and a sleepover. 

I’ve really enjoyed using the service so far and will be seeing if I can make any more doggy friends, they are great fun and mean I get outside for some fresh air and exercise, plus science says stroking an animal lowers your blood pressure and can help boost your mental wellbeing. 

The ratties don’t seem too bothered by the slight smell of dog on me after my park outings with Flick luckily. 

My pal Flick

How about you? Anyone used BorrowMyDoggy? What did you think? 

At the library 

At the library 

I have always been a member of at least one library or another – at one point 4 (local library near my parents, British Library, uni library and the library I currently use). 

Libraries are wonderful places, offering community services and access to the internet all for free. All you need is a library card. 

Recently my local libraries have gone all high tech – and reduced librarians to computerised check out and card entry doors. I’m not sure I’m a fan. 

Today I returned 2 books (historical crime fiction) and took out 4. Two graphic novels, the reading group book (decided to join it for a bit) and another historical crime novel. 

I also checked out the Cityread London program – but the book in question was checked out! 

Libraries are for everyone – whatever age, race, identity, language you speak, the library is for you too. 

Wedding Wednesday: Why I chose to wear an engagement ring 

Wedding Wednesday: Why I chose to wear an engagement ring 

The other day I read a really preachy article (which I don’t have a link to) about why the writer, as a feminist, wouldn’t wear an engagement ring. 

Now I strongly believe that everyone has a right to their own opinion but the tone of the piece and the fact that she was using feminism as her reason really annoyed me. 

I’m a feminist. I believe in equality, equity of the sexes, and a woman’s right to choose what she does with her life and her body. My mum instilled these beliefs in me growing up. 

However, I don’t feel like those beliefs preclude me from wearing my engagement ring. 

I am aware of the original symbolism of wedding rings and the whole patriarchal problematic wedding traditions. But I don’t see the engagement ring on my left hand as a symbol of ownership. 

Nobody, least of all C, owns me. I am my own person, regardless of marital status. 

I see it instead as a symbol of commitment, of a promise to be a team, to stick together, to be a family. I see it as C’s love and mine for him. We’re going to get married, be together for good, legally bound and all that jazz. Not because society says so, but because we want to. 

And that doesn’t contradict my feminism. This is my choice. Isn’t that what women have been fighting for all these years – the ability to make their own choices? 

The Temp Guide to Life

The Temp Guide to Life

Since the end of last year I’ve been temping, having quit my job of six years in an effort to restore some equilibrium to my life, here’s what I’ve learnt. 

1. You will receive little to no training so get used to figuring stuff out. 

2. Be on time, time is literally money when you’re paid by the hour. 

3. Get your agency onside – if they like you, you’ll get sent on nicer assignments. 

4. Have your interview patter down – know what you’re going to say and have examples. 

5. Scope out the lunch sitch as soon as you can, is there somewhere to eat your packed lunch or does everyone eat out. 

6. Plan your route, and if you live in London or another city, add extra time to accomodate delays. 

7. Be friendly but remember they are not your friends, it’s unlikely they’ll remember your name in a few weeks time. 

8. Getting paid weekly might sound great but it can wreck havoc with your bill schedule, hold onto your money to make sure your rent gets paid. 

9. All skills are transferable. Yes, even those ones. 

10. You will hate some temp jobs, just think of the money. 

11. You can give your all, but they won’t offer you a permanent role – aka the dream. 

12. You will encounter some really lovely people and some utter arseholes. Your interpersonal skills will be exemplary. 

13. All databases are basically the same – cheap, crap, utterly hackable. 

14. You will never earn enough per hour to put up with some of the utter bullshit in some offices. So don’t. 

15. Admin jobs basically equal office dogsbody, however they dress it up. 

16. You won’t get a leaving gift after three weeks, you might get a ‘thanks’. 

17. There is no holiday or sick pay – but you will still throw the odd sickie because your bed doesn’t judge you for breaking the printer printing off job descriptions to peruse at lunchtime.

18. Make the most of the free internet access and find your next job, polish your CV, fill in application forms etc, you’re probably only being given the shit jobs anyway – ‘make work’ or just tidying cupboards. I don’t get around to tidying my own cupboards so why am I cataloguing your stationery?

19. Get the Wi-fi password, fill the twiddling thumbs time with Twitter polls and trying to work out who that person is in all of your friend’s Instagram posts. 

20. You will become insanely good at filling empty time so you don’t get sent home early, you need the full day’s hours on your timesheet. 

Life

Life

It’s been a bit quiet recently here in my little corner of the internets. Blame life, it keeps getting in the way of blogging. 

I haven’t had the best week, including spending Wednesday afternoon in tears after a really bad, sad thing happened. I’ve also been so tired that I’ve risked nodding off at work. Oops. 

So what’s keeping me up at night? Well, I never sleep very well anyway due to my delightfully restless legs (muscle spasms all night long) and habit of stopping breathing  (asthma) but there’s been some actual things that my brain has been struggling with.  

In happier news – wedding planning continues apace, but it’s keeping me up as the perfectionist part of me stresses out over details and the obsessive part of my anxiety goes into meltdown. 

The aim is to get everything organised well in advance and then not stress out at the time. Stress does funny things to my body and has caused issues for my mental health in the past. So no-stress wedding planning it is. 

I’m confirming venues this weekend and then paying deposits all over the place – for photos, hair and make up, a jukebox with kareoke (the Mr loves kareoke), a photo booth. You name it, it needs paying. 

A friend is making the cake and another is doing the flowers  (these are their actual jobs) and that’s less hassle. My cousin’s girlfriend has kindly offered to design our invites (she’s a graphic designer) and the Mr is in charge of kitting out the menfolk. 

My lovely Dad has offered to help pay the deposits so we can still afford rent and food, yay. I know not everyone’s so lucky to have family who can help out, so I’m really grateful. 

I just need to sort out the little touches and we’ve even picked our colour scheme, so that’s simple. 

Would you like more wedding posts? A how-to guide if you like? Please let me know. 

The ‘adult tag’ 

The ‘adult tag’ 

​Thought this might be a bit of fun as I lay here dying of serious cramps. Join in! 


1 – How old are you and where do you live?

29, almost 30, North London on the border of Hertfordshire

2 – Where did you expect to be by this age?

I think I expected to be a bit further along in the old career, own house, maybe married. Life is a lot more complicated than you imagine. 

3 – Are you on track to where you want to be now?

Yes and no. My career took a back seat to health issues and that set me back. But I’ll get there. 

4 – What piece of advice do you wish people told you when you were young?

Life is what you make it, take more risks. 

5 – What advice would you give to younger people now?

Take every opportunity that comes your way, don’t be afraid to jump in with both feet. You never know how it’ll turn out. 

6 – Do you still suffer from FOMO?

I don’t know if I ever have – my decisions are my own and if I’ve ‘missed out’ maybe it’s for a good reason. 

7 – What is your opinion on living at home vs moving out in your 20’s?

Having done both in my 20’s, I can see that living at home can have it’s advantages in letting you save some money, but having your own place does allow you more freedoms at time but definitely costs more! 

8 – Have you had any sudden realisations about life/relationships/friendships since hitting your 20’s?

Life’s too short to be an arsehole. Grudges and fallings out are for school kids, move on. It’s not worth trying to force a friendship – it either is or it isn’t. 

10 – Do you feel like an adult?

Sometimes. I pay a bill I don’t want to pay (like council tax) and feel like an adult because I’m doing the adult thing, but sat on the sofa in my pjs eating dark chocolate digestives (the best kind, I’ll fight you) watching TV on a Saturday morning, feel like I’m still a kid. 


Well there you go, my adulting knowledge in a nutshell. Feel free to copy and play along.